With Brad Friedman & Desi Doyen...
By Desi Doyen on 11/3/2016, 11:28am PT  

IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: President Obama suggests re-routing the controversial Dakota Access pipeline; Some major --- and some tricky --- environment-related ballot measures; China's top climate official warns Trump about climate science denial; PLUS: Corporate media covered Clinton emails 25 times more than climate change... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

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IN 'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (see links below): World On Track For 3C Of Warming Under Current Pledges, Warns UNEP; Oil prices slide 3 percent on record U.S. crude stock build; Global carbon intensity falls, on declining coal use; Oil patch states may have seen the last boom; Is Coal’s Political Heft Plunging? One State May Be Canary in Mine; Hurricane Matthew Took A Big Bite Out Of Southeastern States' Beaches... PLUS: Bad News for Honey as U.S. Seeks Handle on Glyphosate Residues in Food... and much, MUCH more! ...

STORIES DISCUSSED ON TODAY'S 'GREEN NEWS REPORT'...

'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (Stuff we didn't have time for in today's audio report)...

  • World On Track For 3C Of Warming Under Current Pledges, Warns UNEP (Guardian UK):
    The commitments made by governments on climate change will lead to dangerous levels of global warming because they are incommensurate with the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new report. The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) said that pledges put forward to cut emissions would see temperatures rise by 3C above pre-industrial levels, far above the the 2C of the Paris climate agreement, which comes into force on Friday.
  • VIDEO: The Weekend Wonk: Jason Box – Faster than Forecast (Climate Crocks):
    Full length video of 'Science and Cocktails' talk given by glaciologist Jason Box.
  • Oil prices slide 3 percent on record U.S. crude stock build (Reuters):
    "This is very, very, very bearish. Nothing else in the report matters," said James L. Williams, energy economist at WTRG Economics in London, Arkansas.
  • Denmark May Hold the Key to Integrating Large Amounts of Intermittent Renewables (Green Tech Media):
    [S]urprisingly, integrating all this wind energy has been a breeze. “The grid operators are finding it hasn’t been as difficult as they thought it would have been,” said Gerdes. “Denmark with a much higher share of renewables...has much less downtime on the grids than we do.”.
  • Global carbon intensity falls, on declining coal use (Climate Home):
    The amount of carbon needed to power the global economy fell to record lows in 2015, as coal consumption in major economies plummeted.
  • Oil patch states may have seen the last boom (E&E News):
    [T]his oil bust could be different. A growing body of research says that changes in the international oil market, rapid advances in wind- and solar-powered generation and regulations aimed at curbing climate change may hold down the price of oil and natural gas for years or even a decade.
  • Climate change? Alabamians in Congress bet on doing nothing (AL.com):
    Scientists overwhelmingly agree that climate change is caused in part by humans, yet – according to that "Climate change denier" study – some 60 percent of Americans are represented by politicians with their heads stuck in the sand. Because the science is "not settled."
    What is settled is where Alabama's congressional delegation's bread is buttered.
  • Is Coal’s Political Heft Plunging? One State May Be Canary in Mine (NY Times):
    The American coal industry, with its billions of dollars and army of lobbyists, has a storied history of muscle and might. But in this northwest corner of Washington, people like Christopher Grannis, a 69-year-old building contractor and stalwart in local civic causes, are standing up to coal. And coal is losing.
  • Hurricane Matthew Took A Big Bite Out Of Southeastern States' Beaches (NPR):
    Beaches in the Southeastern U.S. took a tremendous beating last month from Hurricane Matthew. The U.S. Geological Survey has found that the storm washed over and damaged 15 percent of sand dunes on Florida's Atlantic Coast, 30 percent along Georgia's coastline and 42 percent of the dunes on South Carolina beaches.
  • Bad News for Honey as U.S. Seeks Handle on Glyphosate Residues in Food (Huffington POst):
    Testing for residues of an herbicide developed by Monsanto Co. that has been linked to cancer has turned up high levels in honey from the key farm state of Iowa, adding to concerns about contamination that have triggered at least two lawsuits against honey industry players and prompted scrutiny by regulators.
  • German Cabinet Approves Draft Law Banning GMO Crops:
    The German cabinet has approved a draft law banning cultivation of crops with genetically modified organisms (GMOs), government sources told Reuters on Wednesday.
  • Coal doesn't help the poor; it makes them poorer (Guardian UK):
    A dozen international poverty and development organizations published a report last week on the impact of building new coal power plants in countries where a large percentage of the population lacks access to electricity. The report's conclusions are strikingly counter-intuitive: on the whole, building coal power plants does little to help the poor, and often it can actually make them poorer.
  • No country on Earth is taking the 2 degree climate target seriously (Vox):
    If we mean what we say, no more new fossil fuels, anywhere.


FOR MORE on Climate Science and Climate Change, go to our Green News Report: Essential Background Page

  • NASA Video: If we don't act, here's what to expect in the next 100 years: