With Brad Friedman & Desi Doyen...
By Desi Doyen on 10/7/2014, 3:55pm PT  


 

IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: How many scientists does it take to change a light bulb? Three, according to the Nobel Prize Committee; EPA regulations cut cancer risk from air pollution 65% in CA; L.A. builds an all-electric highway; PLUS: Good news for breathers: Supreme Court upholds (George W. Bush's) EPA ozone regulations ... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

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IN 'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (see links below): Miami Beach races to control flooding from King Tide; Oceans warming much faster than previously thought; Fracking: methane releases jump on public lands; US farmers sue Syngenta over GMO corn rejected by China; Canada launches world's first carbon capture plant; Why 12-ft traffic lanes are disastrous ... PLUS: Buzzfeed asks, "What If We Cared About The Environment Like We Care About Sports?" ... and much, MUCH more! ...

STORIES DISCUSSED ON TODAY'S 'GREEN NEWS REPORT'...

'GREEN NEWS EXTRA' (Stuff we didn't have time for in today's audio report)...

  • VIDEO: If We Cared About The Environment Like We Care About Sports (Buzzfeed):


  • The Ocean’s Surface Layer Has Been Warming Much Faster Than Previously Thought (Climate Progress) [emphasis added]:
    Surface layers of the ocean have been warming significantly faster than previous estimates had projected, according to a new study. The study, published in Nature Climate Change, found that the upper 700 meters (about 2,296 feet) of the ocean have been warming 24 to 55 percent faster since 1970 than previously thought.
  • Miami Beach in race to control flood ahead of annual King Tide (Reuters) [emphasis added]:
    The event, caused by the alignment of the sun, moon and Earth, provides a taste of the potential impact of a longer-term two-foot sea level rise predicted for south Florida by 2060, according to the United States Geological Survey... To combat such widespread flooding, the city has set aside $300 million to 400 million to install up to 50 pumps in the coming years in what some say is a vain effort to protect an estimated $23 billion of real estate.
  • Fracking on Public Lands: "Methane Emissions Soar in Drilling Boom" (Houston Chronicle):
    Methane emissions from oil and gas wells on federal lands and waters jumped 135 percent from 2008 to 2013, an analysis shows, driven by a drilling boom in New Mexico and North Dakota that has outpaced the building of pipelines and processing centers.
  • U.S. Farmers Latest To Sue Syngenta Over GMO Corn Rejected By China (Reuters):
    Farmers from the biggest U.S. corn-growing states have sued Syngenta AG over sales of genetically modified corn seed not approved by China, joining global exporters in pursuing damages from the Swiss-based company.
  • Can this coal plant stop climate change? (CS Monitor):
    A Canadian utility opened the doors on the world's first commercial-scale coal plant to capture and store its carbon emissions. If the project and others like it are successful, carbon capture and storage technology could play a major role in fighting climate change.
  • Like Sea Level, Times Environmental Coverage on the Rise (NY Times):
    [A] year ago, the signs weren't particularly good for coverage of the environment in The New York Times....I'm glad to report, things are looking up again. Since the survival of the planet ranks pretty high on my list of what matters, it seems worth noting here exactly what's happening and why.
  • Why 12-Foot Traffic Lanes Are Disastrous for Safety and Must Be Replaced Now (The Atlantic) [emphasis added]:
    When lanes are built too wide, many bad things happen. In a sentence: pedestrians are forced to walk further across streets on which cars are moving too fast and bikes don't fit.
  • FRACKING: 'Moment of Truth' on Emissions (NY Tiems):
    If the administration takes the right course, methane emissions could likely be reduced by 40 percent or 50 percent over the next five years - enough to make natural gas a genuinely cleaner alternative to coal and a critical component in reducing greenhouse gasses. But if it doesn't - if the government decides to back away from regulation, or allow industry to reduce emissions voluntarily - then the promise of natural gas as a cleaner fuel could well go unrealized.
  • VIDEO: August 2014: Greenland is the New Black (Climate Crocks, Dark Snow Project):
    Newest observations show the lowest reflectivity on record for Greenland's Upper elevations.
  • More Bad News For Coal: Mountaintop Removal Nixed By Court (CleanTechnia):
    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday won another major legal victory in the long saga of one of the largest mountaintop removal mining permits in West Virginia history.
  • 4 Scenarios Show What Climate Change Will Do To The Earth, From Pretty Bad To Disaster (Fast CoExist):
    But exactly how bad is still an open question, and a lot depends not only on how we react, but how quickly. The rate at which humans cut down on greenhouse gas emissions--if we do choose to cut them--will have a large bearing on how the world turns out by 2100, the forecasts reveal.


FOR MORE on Climate Science and Climate Change, go to our Green News Report: Essential Background Page

  • Skeptical Science: Database with FULL DEBUNKING of ALL Climate Science Denier Myths
  • How to Solve Global Warming: It's the Energy Supply (Scientific American):
    Restraining global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius will require changing how the world produces and uses energy to power its cities and factories, heats and cools buildings, as well as moves people and goods in airplanes, trains, cars, ships and trucks, according to the IPCC. Changes are required not just in technology, but also in people's behavior.
  • Warning: Even in the best-case scenario, climate change will kick our asses (Grist)
  • NASA Video: Warming over the last 130 years, and into the next 100 years: